statistical analysis and interpretation

Research Articles.html

Research Articles

The question that may arise in your mind is, “Why are peer-reviewed research articles important when we can easily access similar information from the Internet?”

The answer to this question is quite simple. When searching for information on topics on the Internet, it is difficult to verify the quality of the work because anyone can publish anything on the Internet. Therefore, you will not know whether the experimental methods used are appropriate and the results interpreted are accurate or the individual published the information just for financial gain. However, in the case of published peer-reviewed research papers, the situation is completely different. The peer-review process usually ensures that the paper is of high quality, presents unique results, and is not motivated only by financial gain.

The Peer-Review Process

When a psychologist submits a paper to a peer-reviewed journal, such as in the articles listed in the PsycARTICLES database of EBSCOhost, at least three other psychologists read the paper and critique it. They make sure that:

  • Valid and reliable experimental methods are used.
  • Questions asked are reasonable.
  • Conclusions (statistical analysis and interpretation) drawn from the results are accurate.

The peer reviewers sometimes also offer additional insights into the topic that the author did not know about.

Finally, authors need to reveal if they have any financial interest in any aspect of the study.

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The Peer-Review Process

When a psychologist submits a paper to a peer-reviewed journal, such as in the articles listed in PsycARTICLES database of EBSCOhost, at least three other psychologists read the paper and critique it. They make sure that:

• Valid and reliable experimental methods are used.

• Questions asked are reasonable.

• Conclusions (statistical analysis and interpretation) drawn from the results are accurate.

The peer reviewers sometimes also offer additional insights into the topic that the author did not know about. Finally, authors need to reveal if they have any financial interest in any aspect of the study.